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Matt Smock, Houston Commercial Diver, Dies Working on High Seas | Texas DOHSA Lawyers

Posted on Jan 11, 2011

Matt Smock, 30, a Houston, Texas commercial diver, was found unresponsive this past Saturday while working on a vessel in navigation in the Gulf of Mexico. An autopsy is planned to find out the cause of death for Mr. Smock. The incident stemmed from what is believed to be a mechanical malfunction with diving equipment, according to one local Texas fire official.

Smock was a diver who died after cleaning the hull of a ship with a scrubbing machine offshore from Galveston, Texas. He dove from an offshore service boat to clean the hull of a ship about 10 miles offshore, out from the jetties in an area where ships normally anchor.

His fellow crew members aboard the King Arthur, a commercial diving vessel, performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation on him until the service boat docked at Pier 9 in Galveston. Galveston firefighters took over lifesaving maneuvers once the ship docked, and an ambulance took Smock to the University of Texas Medical Branch, and was pronounced dead at 1:37 p.m., according to the Galveston County Medical Examiner's Office.

The case is under investigation by the Coast Guard's Marine Safety Unit in Texas City.

Smock was working on the King Arthur, which is a commercial diving vessel. Since he was working as a member of a vessel's crew, his survivors may qualify for compensation under the Death on the High Seas Act (DOHSA). Ascertaining which maritime law will apply to this case requires an in-depth knowledge of offshore injury and death cases. DOHSA may not be the only potential remedy for Mr. Smock's family.

When a seaman dies as a result of an employer's negligence or because a vessel or its equipment are unseaworthy, the worker's family may file for benefits under the Death on the High Seas Act (DOHSA). The incident must occur on the high seas, more than three nautical miles from shore. This along with other issues related to commercial diving and dive boat injuries should be discussed as soon as possible with an experienced maritime law firm.


..................... END OF COPY ...............

MY COMMENT AND OPTION;

 

ALL PUBLIC INFORMATION SHOULD BE AVAILABLE TO ANY PERSON INTRESTED.

 

ALL THIS INFORMATION SHOULD BE COLLECT AS IT IS AVAILABLE AND NOT WAIT FOR THE "OFFICIAL REPORT"

 

WHY?

 

AS TO LEARN AND NOT WAIT!

 

Regards

 

Joseph

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That is a big WTF first of all he was cleaning a hull so he was not deep, next "?" would be did he have a bail out bottle on, and how was his health sounds like a hart attack too me. Because even if you ran out of air you could still pull your self form under the ship by using your umbilical or from the umbilical of the cleaning unit if you have a bail out bottle! I have seen lot's of people dive with out a bail out bottle just because they think I am not deep and do not want to deal with the weight of the bail out, that is just plan stupid. There is a saying you can drowned in 2 feet of water face down. The only thing it could be if it was not from that, is some how CO2 built up in the air system and he just went to sleep. Sad news bruddah's that is why you have to watch your back and your team mate's back at all times. And number one rule check all the equipment you are working with before someone dives some time it is easy to just start it up and ya it's ready.

Or...

We could show some class for a change and give his friends and family time to grieve, before stirring the s***............

Just saying....

 

God speed Matt.

Every accident can be avoided, so very few details about the cause of death. The report goes from cleaning the hull to CPR. Whatever happened in between is of importance and not mentioned. What happened? So many posibilities. Bad gear maintenance... possible. Bad paperwork before the dive (diver at work procedures) I would guess. What mask or hat was he wearing? Scuba? Aga (light and comfi for a job like this) Wouldnt be the first one who's mask get sucked on to a seachest and suffocate. Then they put the pump off and the divers mask is back on and there he is dangling on his umbillical or floating on the surface, big mistery... Serviceboat? What happened to the chopper?


Coast Guard Investigating Death of Commercial Diver
Fri, January 14, 2011 
Posted in Alaska News
Ed Schoenfeld, CoastAlaska – Juneau
The U.S. Coast Guard is looking into the death of a commercial diver harvesting sea cuc**bers near Metlakatla.
Ketchikan Marine Safety Detachment staff traveled to the southern Southeast Alaska city to investigate the incident. There’s no word yet of what they found.
The agency reports the man was diving off the Island Dancer, a 68-foot fishing tender, early Wednesday afternoon. Crew members said he surfaced after a dive, pulled off his mask and sank back into the water.
The crew pulled him out using his air hose and attempted to revive him without success.
The death took place in Chester Bay, near Metlakatla. The Tsimshian community is on Annette Island, about 15 miles south of Ketchikan.
The Coast Guard had no further information about their investigation as of Friday afternoon. Metlakatla’s Police Department was also involved in investigation but had no comment on the effort.

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