I propose that Cdiver has a contest between all the guys that have made their own hats.  Not for the guys who hot-rod out their manufactured rigs, although that could be a sub-category.  I suppose there should be a mask category too.  And to round it out, maybe a widget and gizmo section or so...

Victory comes with the following honors.

Entry into a cheezy hall of fame with pics and stuff,

bragging rights for a year, or longer if we forget to do it on time next year.

A cool title and honorary.... something or other, donated by......... so and so and... what's his face

a plaque put under the winning rig, possibly a mount made for the helmet by that one guy who does that stuff, likely on the mantle, elaborating on its various coolness, neatness or other ness's that may apply.


May be kind of fun.

Individuals who are also existing helmet manufacturers, or work for one, to apply, must build the rig submitted entirely by their own hand and design, without company or other asset or assistance and not be remotely similar to a model they currently in production by them.

May be really really fun actually.

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General Aquadyne's patented DM-7 was a bandmask with a fiberglass shell covering. Shortly after the DM-7 hit the market KM came out with their version the SL-16.

In the KM patent that shows a man donning a helmet with a toilet-seat yoke, if you read the actual patent, the only thing that is covered by the patent is the hinge on the back of the yoke, not the helmet itself.

From what I've been told it was litigation and landlord issues that put General Aquadyne out of business. (DECA was located in the same building for quite a while).

Ben Miller's fiberglass helmet was the first of the all-in-one fiberglass helmet's that were sold commercially, everyone else borrowed design features from his hat. But fiberglass wasn't popular, diver's back in the day wanted metal on their heads and Ben abandoned the fiberglass hat for his now famous bronze helmets.

Ben never patented or trademarked his helmets or their designs and the Miller designs passed into the public domain years before KM acquired the Miller helmet.

As for the bandmask, there were several bandmasks that were patented and/or manufactured prior to the KM-8, rights to which were sold to US Divers. US Divers redesigned and manufactured the KMB-8, KMB-9, KMB- 9-1/2, KMB-10, from 1969-1988; as well as the USN Mk-1/Mod-0 bandmask, with the exception of the one year the contract was awarded to Morse Diving.
Just for the purpose of public education, the band mask frame that I used for a pattern to cast from was a U.S. Divers - 8 frame which I still have and its shape was altered with several improvements.
Hi guys looking for info on a general aquadyne dm4 I have come across it is in very good working order, but was wondering if anybody has used onein the field any help would be of great help. Also if you would like to talk my number is 970-481-3163. Thanks Rick Jaruzel
I actually liked the three different DMC-7 I dove here and there.

My only beef was that the lead shot in two of them kinda rattled around a bit, then again these hats had many miles on them when I dove. I believe that Aquadyne makes a hat still, in florida somewhere, DMC-8or9 now.
D*** Jones sold the rights to the Aquadyne helmets and masks many years ago. Those masks that are currently being manufactured and marketed have nothing in common with the original Aquadyne masks but the name.

Divex, UK claims to own the rights to the Aquadyne airhats, but so do several others.
They look similar enough.

The AH2 and AH3, that's like claiming rights to the wheel or frying pan.

Ok, I claim rights on decompression chambers with double locks, and bells with the hatch configured on the bottom, I also plan to change Boyle's law, in wording only by 25%, we will then call it Layda's law... I will then rewrite history to imply that my version came first, long before the theorem placed by Boyle, in the 1700's.

Then I would sue Boyle for trademark infringement...
I would then do the same to Henry, Dalton and Charles, how dare they have my idea before me! The unmitigated nerve!!!

Is that how this game works then? lol.

I am such a retard sometimes, you all will have to pardon me...


grumble grumble grouch groan........
Man, those 100's looked awesome! I've dove 200's, 300's and owned a 400 w/ dial a breath, but never a 100...

Man, would I love to dive one of them....

Thanks Diva!!!!
Funny how divingheritage.com refuses to put my helmet pics one their website but they will put some b******* / crappy ones on that you know were never used for commercial diving. All of my prototypes were used and as far as I know are still in use.
You're kidding?

No s***?

We'll just direct them a slew of requests for it as website viewers, Hear that? jam em up hands.

info@divingheritage.com
Subject:Virtual Helmet and mask collection.

Martin, I call BS and am on it, for what I can do, anyone else who wants to assist, it'd sure be nice to be one voice of many.......

you just make sure to send them pics of not just the hat, but your hats being used by the guys that bought them from ya.

Like your work.
While we're looking at unusual helmets of the past, heres an example of the DM-7 used refitted to work with the Innerspace Systems Porpoise Pack-1 rebreather, circa 1974.


The DM-4 was GA's first mask, the DM-5 came out in 1970 (it was used in the 1971 syndicated TV series "Primus"), and the DM-6 came along in 1974 all of these masks could be worn with spider, hood & spider or with the hard shell that was entirely detachable. They were versitile in that they could be used as either demand or free-flow, using tanks or umbilical, mixed gas or air.

The DM-7 first came out in 1974 and ulitized a DM-5 bandmask, the shell could be added and attached with 12 screws and it became a helmet. Later models were integrated into a single helmet the DMC-7.
getting warmer!!! lol

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